ILLINOIS GENEALOGY EXPRESS

A part of U. S. Genealogy Express

 

PIATT COUNTY
ILLINOIS

Biographies

The following Biographies have been extracted from the following sources:
HISTORY OF PIATT COUNTY, ILLINOIS by Emma C. Piatt  - 1883

A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y- Z

PLEASE NOTE:  If you are interested in one of these names,
please contact me and I will try to put it on here ahead of the others that are not done yet.
Sharon Wick, Piatt County Host

< CLICK HERE TO RETURN TO 1883 BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX >

< CLICK HERE TO RETURN TO ALL INDEXES OF BIOGRAPHIES >

pg ok

Unity Twp. -
MR. S. V. HAGEMAN, hardware merchant, Hammond, is a native of Pike county, Illinois.  He moved from there to Logan county in 1863 or 1864, and in 1875 settled on a farm in Piatt county.   After staying there five years he left his farm, not selling it, however, and moved into Hammond, opened a hardware and grocery store in June, 1881.  He was married in 1874, to Lizzie Rathbun, of Pike county.  They have had three children, two of whom are living, Oscar Y. and Silas.
Source: History of Piatt County History together with a Brief History of Illinois from the Discovery of the Upper Mississippi to the Present Time by Emma C. Piatt With Map and Illustrations. 1883 - Page 427

Unity Twp. -
MR. DANIEL HARSHBARGER
, a retired farmer, was born in Champaign county, Ohio, and is of German descent.  His father moved from Ohio to Montgomery county, Indiana, and in 1823 made the second settlement in that county.  He died in Illinois in 1857.  His wife died in Indiana in 1853.  Mr. Daniel Harshbarger was married in 1834, to Miss Huldah Quick, of Montgomery county.  They moved to Piatt county in 1837, and for the first summer lived with Daniel's father in a cabin built the same year.  In the fall Daniel went into his own round-log cabin covered with clapboards and containing a hickory pole bedstead.  When he came to the county he had $200 in money, five sheep, one horse, one cow, one hog, and some spinning wheels upon which Mrs. Harshbarger did all the spinning for the family.  Mr. Harshbarger now has a walnut chest which is a hundred years old and a pair of steelyards, which came from Germany, that are one hundred and fifty years old.  This family remained in their round-log cabin until 1848, when they built the second brick house in the county.  The brick was burned by Jim Bennet on Mr. Harshbarger's place.  Mr. and Mrs. Harshbarger still occupy this with their son John and his family.  When about fifty-five years of age Mr. Harshbarger stopped his long-continued hard labor and deeded his ten or eleven hundred acres of land to his children, with the proviso that they were to keep himself and wife.  After stating this fact to us he very contentedly remarked, "the children all appear to be reconciled to the way I divided it."  Mr. Michael Harshbarger is Mr. Daniel Harshbarger's oldest living son (see his name).  His daughter, Sarah, married Mr. Joseph Baker (see his name).  Mr. John Harshbarger was married in 1868 to Anna Gaw, from Indiana.  Their children are Carrie, William D. and Frank Merritt.  John is a farmer and stock dealer and lives on the old homestead place where he has lived all his life.  Miss Emma Gaw, Mrs. John Harshbager's sister, is making her home with them at present.  Miss Emma seems to possess natural talent for drawing.  We suggest that she should embrace all possible chances of cultivating such talent.  Barbara Harshbarger married William Carroll and is living in Douglas county.  Their children's names are Ivory Bell, Ivol, Icel Lee and Florence MabelMr. Daniel Harshbarger was the first justice of the peace in his section of the county.  He served as such for twelve years, until they began lawing, when he refused to serve longer.  A gentleman who has known "Uncle Dan" a long while says that he is "as honest as the day is long," and that his extreme sense of justice led him to be considered one of the best peacemakers in the county.  His law was, "Do right whatever the consequences," and he has been known to prevent suits many times by going out of his way to see the men and who united in the bonds of matrimony in Unity township, and for six or eight years performed the marriage ceremony for all who were married in Lake Fork timber.  We must tell a little joke on "Uncle Dan" which was related to us by a neighbor of his.  What we have already told of his peace-making abilities would lead one to think that it would grieve him very much to have a neighbor think ill of him.  One morning when out he met a neighbor, Mr. Thomas Goodson, who, instead of giving his usual "good morning!" said in a very sober tone of voice "I thought I would tell you there is a coolness between us."  -- Uncle Dan, "with a surprised and anxious look, and in that deep and earnest tone of voice of his said,  "Why, Tommy, Tommy, what is it!  I never had a hard feeling toward you in the world."  Mr. Goodson, after carrying his joke to the desired extent, remarked that "it was the sharp breeze which caused the coolness between them."  Mr. Harshbarger held the office of supervisor for one year.  He was the first person to make a profession of religion on Lake Fork and was baptized June 28, 1842, by Mr. John Collins, and in the same fall Mrs. Harshbarger, Mrs. Joseph Moore and Mrs. James Utterback were baptized.  Mr. Harshbarger relates that in early days in their neighborhood the people used often to get quite lonesome.  At Mr. Monroe's they used to go on top of the house to watch across the prairie, hoping to see some one coming.  In case they should, word would soon be sent around and all the neighborhood would collect at one house.  Since writing the above we have received the following items from Mr. John Harshbarger.  He took the measure of twelve of the apple trees which his father set out in 1839 and found that they averaged in circumference five feet and one inch - the largest measuring seven feet and three inches.  The tallest tree was forty feet and seven inches in height, and in the twelve the following varieties are represented, Early Harvest, Golden Pippin, Vandaver Pippin and Spitzenburg.  These trees are in the thriving condition and in 1881 some of them bore as high as twenty-five bushels of apples apiece.  Mr. Harshbarger has in his possession a Seth Thomas clock which has kept good time for fifty years.
Source: History of Piatt County History together with a Brief History of Illinois from the Discovery of the Upper Mississippi to the Present Time by Emma C. Piatt With Map and Illustrations. 1883 - Page 423

Unity Twp. -
MICHAEL O. HARSHBARGER, farmer, near Atwood, is a native of Indiana, and came to Piatt county in 1837. He was married October 30, 1862, to Emeline Stevens, who died in 1865, leaving one boy, Charles M. He next married Arville Whetsel in 1869. She had to children, Dora May and John Lee. Mr. Harshbarger owns about 460 acres of land, part of which lies in Douglas county. He has evidently been a hardworking man, as the result of his labors shows. In 1876 he built one of the finest houses in the county. It contains fifteen rooms and cost $8,000. The brick for the house were made on his own farm. He burnt some 180,000 brick and sold enough to pay for putting up the walls of his house. This is an example of thrift and energy not often shown in this country. In 1881 he built one of the best frame barns in the county. It is 68X60 feet, is two story, will hold sixteen horses and contain one hundred ton of hay. Mr. Harshbarger has made his money by farming and raising stock. When he was married he had $600 and some land which his father Mr. Daniel Harshbarger, gave him. In conversing with Mr. Harshbarger we quite readily discovered strong filial devotion, which most men of his age, if they have it, are quite successful in covering up. Since taking the above notes from Mr. Harshbarger, we have regretted to hear that his wife died on January 9, 1882.
Source: History of Piatt County History together with a Brief History of Illinois from the Discovery of the Upper Mississippi to the Present Time by Emma C. Piatt With Map and Illustrations. 1883 - Page 426
Unity Twp. -
SAMUEL HARSHBARGER, farmer, was born in Ohio in 1811. He moved from Ohio to Montgomery county, Indiana, in 1823, and from there to Piatt county in 1837. He was married in Indiana, to Sarah Quick, who had eleven children, seven of whom are living. Clarissa was the wife of Nathaniel Shonkwiler. Aaron married Arvilla Wildman, who had seven children. He moved to Texas, and next married Jennie Romine. His third wife was a Miss Waters, Elizabeth Harshbarger married Alfred Taylor (now deceased), and has five children. She lives in Champaign county. Ambrose Harshbarger married Margaret Richardson and lives on the old homestead place. They have six children, Samuel, Caroline, who married Wm. Taylor, and lives in Douglas county, Lucy, Effie, William and Henry. Jefferson Harshbarger married Francis Sexton and has four children. He lives in Champaign county. Isaac married Mary J. Goff. He has a large family of children, and lives at Atwood. Samuel married Emmazilla Wildman, and lives in Unity township. They have a family of children, some of whose names are Delia, Arthur, Clara B. and Reuben Horace. Naomi Harshbarger is the wife of David Corell, a sewing machine agent of Bement. They have two children living, May and William. Sylvia Harshbarger, deceased, was the wife of David Cade, of Douglas county. He was married again in 1881, and lives in Champaign county. The death of the first Mrs. Harshbarger occurred in 1853. Mr. Harshbarger next married Mrs. Melissa Holden, the widow of an old settler in that part of the county. She died about 1870, and Mr. Harshbarger took for his third wife Miss Eliza Randolph. The second year after Mr. Harshbarger moved to the county, there were seven families was sick except himself and son Aaron. Mr. Harshbarger had to leave the sick and go to mill at Eugene, Indian, seventy miles distant. Before going he threshed the grain by having the horses tramp it. He was gone eight days, and upon his return did not expect to find all the family alive. Mr. Harshbarger relates one of his deer hunts in the following manner: "I was standing in the woods on a log when I saw a big buck coming toward me. I let him come close and then shot. The gun cracked and the deer came bawling and jumping toward me, and I - climbed up a sapling." Mr. Harshbarger has long been regarded a, "bee hunter." He has worked with bees ever since he was fifteen years old. He has had bees every year since. He has made hundreds of dollars with his bees alone. He has found at least seventy bee-trees in his lifetime. The most honey he ever got out of a tree was ten gallons after it was strained. Mr. Harshbarger was ordained a minister in the Christian church in 1843, and has preached on a large circuit extending throughout this county and into Macon. DeWitt, Champaign, Vermilion, Douglas and Moultrie counties. He has evidently done a great deal of good in his lifetime, and his kindly countenance and earnest words indicate that he will do much more yet.
Source: History of Piatt County History together with a Brief History of Illinois from the Discovery of the Upper Mississippi to the Present Time by Emma C. Piatt With Map and Illustrations. 1883 - Page 425
Unity Twp. -
MR. J. A. HAWKS, a miller and tile maker, of Mackville, is of English and German descent, and is a native of New York.  He came west of 1869.  He taught school a Mackville for four terms after he first came to the county.  He was in teh general merchandise business for a time with Mr. Gross and then began milling.  In 1876 he bought the mill which Griggs & Marshall had built.  He was married in 1877, to Mary Mitchell, a native of Ohio.  They reside in Mackville and have no children.  Mr. Hawks went to the war from New York, in Battery G, 3d N. Y. Lt. Art.  Roanoke Island, Plymouth and Kingston were the principal battles in which he engaged.  He was never wounded, but was taken prisoner and was one month (words missing)  bby prison.  Mr. Hawks has been superintendent of a Sunday school and township treasurer and supervisor.
Source: History of Piatt County History together with a Brief History of Illinois from the Discovery of the Upper Mississippi to the Present Time by Emma C. Piatt With Map and Illustrations. 1883 - Page 427
Unity Twp. -
MR. RICHARD HELTON, merchant, was born in 1822, in North Carolina.  His parents were natives of the same state, from which they moved to Wayne county, Indiana, sixteen miles in the woods from Newport.  They, with eight children, landed at this place between Christmas and New Year's, and the snow was knee-deep.  They lived here beside a big log and a camp-fire until spring, hauling all provisions on a one-horse sled from Newport.  Mr. Helton moved to Douglas county in 1857 or 1858.  He was married in 1838, to Ann Willis.   They have lived for ten or twelve years in Piatt county.  He was the first person who built a house in Atwood.  His store was the first in the town and he opened the first grain office in the place.  Henry Helton and wife, ne Josephine Willingham, have one child, and live in Douglas county.  Joel married Mary Faulhaber, lives at Atwood and is also a grain dealer.  He has three children, Birdie and Gertie, twins, and Alfred.  George and Rebecca, the youngest daughter, lives at home.  Janie married Thomas Barnes, a carpenter, and lives in Atwood.  Mr. Helton is a member of the masonic order and of a life insurance society.
Source: History of Piatt County History together with a Brief History of Illinois from the Discovery of the Upper Mississippi to the Present Time by Emma C. Piatt With Map and Illustrations. 1883 - Page 426
Unity Twp. -
 

Source: History of Piatt County History together with a Brief History of Illinois from the Discovery of the Upper Mississippi to the Present Time by Emma C. Piatt With Map and Illustrations. 1883 - Page 427

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

NOTES:

 

* Picture
 

CLICK HERE to RETURN to
PIATT COUNTY, OHIO
CLICK HERE to RETURN to
ILLINOIS GENEALOGY EXPRESS
U. S. GENEALOGY EXPRESS
Free Genealogy Research is Our Mission
This Website was created by Sharon Wick exclusively for U. S. Genealogy Express.
All Rights Reserved 2004
Submitters retain all rights to their donated material.