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State of Maryland

History of Maryland
(
Source: History of Maryland from its First Settlement in 1634, to the Year 1848. by James McSherry - Publ. Baltimore: Printed and Published by John Murphy, No. 178 Market Street - 1949
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Table of Contents

INTRODUCTORY CHAPTER 
Discovery of America 13
Difference in Character of the People of English and Spanish America 14
Sebastian Cabot discovers North America 15
He touches on Maryland 15
Verazzini passes the mouth of the Chesapeak 16
The English attempt to colonize North America 16
London and Plymouth Companies 16
Virginia Settled 17
Capt. John Smith Explores the Chesapeake 18
Second and third Charters of the Virginia Company 20
Charters forfeited 21
Sir George Calvert 21
Prepares to Found Maryland 22
His Death 24
The Charter Issues to his Son Cecilius 24
CHAPTER I.
THE SETTLEMENT OF MARYLAND.
The First Colony sails from England 26
Dangers of the Voyage 27
Landing at St. Clement's 30
Exploration of the Potomac 31
Leonard Calvert's Treaty with the Indians 32
The Founding of St. Mary's 32
The Indians of St. Mary's 34
CHAPTER II.
CLAIIBORNE'S FIRST REBELLION.
Colony visited by Governor Harvey of Virginia 38
Claiborne's claims to Kent Island, &c. 39
His Rebellion and Defeat on the Pocomok 40
His Flight 41
First General Assembly of Maryland 41
Conditions of Plantations 41
The Isle of Kent 42
The Second General Assembly 42
Its Constitution 43
Dispute the Proprietary concerning the framing of Laws 44
Trial of one of the Rebels 44
End of the Rebellion 45
The Missionaries aong the Indians 46
Baptism of Tayac 49
Indian Wars 51
Settlement on the Schuylkill 54
Third General Assembly 54
Town House and Water Mill builg 56
CHAPTER III.
CLAIBORN'S AND INGLE'S REBELLION
Success of Parliament over the King in England 57
Its Effects in Maryland 57
Claiborne's and Ingle' Rebellion 57
Governor Calvert takes refuge in Virginia 59
The Rebels subdued and order restored 60
Death of Leonard Calvert, first Governor of Marylnad 61
Thomas Green, Governor 62
Liberty of Conscience 63
The Puritans received in the Province 68
Reduction of Maryland 70
Troubles with the Indians 71
Lord Baltimore attempts to recover the Province 72
Battle of Providence 75
Execution of the Prisoners by the Puritans 76
Restoration of the Province 79
Fendal's Rebellion 80
CHAPTER IV.
THE PROTESTANT REVOLUTION
Peace and Prosperity 81
Ppopulation - New Counties - Cities 82
Negro Slaves 85
Tobacco Trade 87
The Friends 88
Seneca Indians infest the Frontier 89
Expedition under Major Trueman 90
Complaints against the Proprietary Government 91 91
Support for Episcopal Clergymen 92
Edward Husband's case - Fendal and Coode 92
Hostility o fthe Crown to the Province 93
Protestant Revolution 93
Convention of the Associators in arms 95
First Royal Governor 95
Catholics Disfranchised and Episcopal Chuch established by law 95
Contest with the Proprietary 97
Removal fo the Government from St. Mary's to Annapolis 98
Downfall of St. Mary's  98
The French wars - Crown Requisitions 100
Attemps to Repeal the Charter 102
Effects of the Royal Administration 103
Intolerance of the People 105
CHAPTER V.
RESTORATION OF THE PROVINCE
Struggles of Democracy 106
Relations with the Indians  108
Internal Improvements 110
Growth of Annapolis - Baltimore - Frederick 111
Georgetown 112
Military Affairs 112
Governors under the Restoration 114
New Counties 114
Population - Manufactures 115
Schools and Churches 117
Currency 117
Boundary Disputes with Virginia 118
With Delaware and Pennsylvania 120
With Virginia on the West 124
CHAPTER VI.
THE FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR.
The last of the Lords Baltimore 127
The French and Indian War 127
Congress at albany 128
Capture of Washingotn at Little Meadows 128
Maryland takes part in the War. 128
Gov. Sharpe commander-in-chief of forces on the Ohio 130
Braddock's Defeat 133
Its Consequences - Inroads of the Savages 134
Militia and Volunteers assemble on the Frontiers 135
Panic of the Inhabitants 135
Fort Cumberland - Disputes as to its Command 136
Preparations for a Second Expedition 138
Defence of the Frontiers - Fort Frederick 139
New Inroads of the Savaes 140
March of General Forbes 145
Grant's Defeat 146
Fight at Loyal Hanning 148
Capture of Fort Duquesne and close of the War. 150
CHAPTER VII.
THE DAYS BEFORE THE REVOLUTION
The Rights of the People 150
The Stamp Act - Resistance to it in Maryland 151
Zachariah Hood, the Stamp Collector, driven from the Province 153
Protest of the Assembly 155
Daniel Dulany 156
Congress of Deputies from the Colonies 157
Firmness of the House of Delegates and the people 157
The Stamp Act declared unconstitutional 161
Its Repeal 162
Compliment to Chatham and Camden 163
Duty on Tea - Opposition of Maryland 164
Non-importation Societies 166
The Proclamation and the Vestry Acts. 168
Charles Carroll of Carrollton and Daniel Dulany 170
Revival of the Tax upon Tea 173
The Maryland Convention 173
Tea-burning at Annapolis 174
Second Maryland Convention - the last Proprietary 176
Retrospect 177
CHAPTER VIII.
THE REVOLUTION.
Unanimity of the People of Maryland 180
Preparations for War 181
Lexington, Concord, and Bunker Hill 182
Association of the Freemen of Maryland 185
Rifle Companies raised and sent to Boston 186
Regular Troops - Colonel Smallwood 186
Material of War - Efforts to Supply it 187
Lord Dunmore - Coolly's scheme 188
Dunsmore's Intrigues on the Eastern Shore 189
The British sloop Otter in the Chesapeake 191
Gov. Eden compelled to leave the Province 192
The DELARATION OF INDEPENDENCE 194
Maryland Troops ordered to join Washington. 197
CHAPTER IX.
THE BATTLES OF THE OLD MARYLAND LINE.
Brooklyn Heights 199
Retreat from Long Island and New York 203
The Heights of Harlaem 204
White plains 205
Storming of Fort Washington  208
Trenton 211
Princeton 212
CHAPTER I.
THE NEW CONSTITUTION AND STATE GOVERNMENT
Convention to form the Constitution organizes 215
New Counties formed 215
Reorganization of the Line 216
Billl of Rights and Constitution adopted 217
Contest with Virginia 217
Form of Government, Legislative, Executive, Judiciary 218
Progress of Maryland 220
The first State Legislature 222
The first State Governor 224
Exertions to Sustain the War 225
CHAPTER XI.
CAMPAIGN OF 1777
Enemy in the Chesapeake 226
Attack on Staten Island 227
Battle of the Brandywine 229
Defeat of Wayne and Smallwood's Militia 231
Battle of Germantown 232
Defence of Fort Miffin 236
Gist's Militia Skirmish with the Enemy 237
Maryland Line winter at Wilmington 238
Alliance with France 239
CHAPTER XII.
78 AND '79.
Active measures to fill the State's quota of troops 240
Tories - measures to repress them 241
Disputes between the House and Senate 242
Court of Appeals appointed 243
Claims to the Western Lands 244
Campaign of 1778 244
Battle of Monmuth 245
Maryland Line in New Jersey 248
Campaign of 1779 249
CHAPTER XIII.
INTERNAL AFFAIRS.
Condition of the State 251
State Marine - Reduced 252
Bills of Credit - their Depreciation 253
Provision for the Army 254
Non-jurors - Mr. Chase charges a Senator with toryism 256
Naturalization of Foreigners 257
Second Governor of the State 258
Paper Money - its Depreciation 259
Confiscation of the Estates of the Dissaffected 259
The Confederation 262
Maryland insists on her claims to the Public Lands 263
Succeeds - Confederation Ratified 264
The Articles of Confederation 265
CHAPTER XIV.
THE SOUTHERN CAMPAIGNS.
Maryland Line ordered to the South  266
Battle of Camden 269
Reduction of the Line 275
Battle of Cowpens - Howard 278
Greene's Retreat - Williams 281
Battle of Guilford Court House 286
Battle of Hobkirk's Hill 290
Assault on Ninety-six - Augusta 293
Battle of Eutaw 295
The Maryland Line and "the Buffs" 296
The Campaign in Virginia 299
Triumphal Reception of Washington at Annapolis 300
CHAPTER XV.
THE CLOSE OF THE REVOLUTION.
New Issue of Paper Money 302
Tory Conspiracy in Western Marylnad 302
Leaders tried and executed 303
Close of the War and Peace with Great Britain 305
The Maryland Line during the Revolution 306
The Cincinnati 307
Maryland Society 308
Seat of the National Government 309
Washington resigns his commission at Annapolis 310
CHAPTER XVI.
EVENTS FORM THE REVOLUTION TO THE WAR OF 1812
National Debt - State Debt. 312
State's Bank of England Stock 313
The Susquehanna Canal - the Potomac Company 314
Convention between Maryland and Virginia 316
Ecclesiastical Affairs and Educaton 316
Smallwood, Governor - Howard 318
Constitution of the United States adopted 318
Maryland Convention ratifies and confirms it 321
Organization of the Federal Government 323
Public Debt. 324
District of Columbia laid out. 325
The Whiskey Insurrection 327
The French War - Howard 328
The Right of Suffrage Enlarged 329
New Judicial System 331
Difficulties with England 331
The Embargo 332
Maryland Sustains the Administration 333
Declaration of War 333
Mob at Baltimore 334
CHAPTER XVII.
THE WAR OF 1812
The British in the Chesapeake 335
Battle of Bladensburg 336
Battle of North Point - the 12th of September 340
Bombardment of Fort McHEnry 343
"The Star Spangled Banner" 345
CHAPTER XVII.
FROM THE PEACE OF 1816 TO THE YEAR 1846
Peace with Great Britain 346
Growth of Baltimore 346
Reform Agitation - its early rise and progress 347
The Nineteen Van Buren Senatorial Electors 349
Reform of the Constitution. 353
Slavery and the Blacks 356
Liberia - Colonization Society 359
Public Schools 360
Public Improvements - the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal 362
Baltimore and Ohio Rail road 365
Public Debt. 366
Repudiation 370
Resumption of the payment of the interest  373
Agriculture 373
Manufactures 375
The Mexican War 375
Conclusion 376
APPENDIX
A. List of the Officers of the Battalion and Independent Companies 378
B. List of the Officers of the Flying Camp, 1776 379
C. Arrangement of the Seven Battalions, 1777 379
D. Arrangement of the Maryland Line, June 1st, 1781 386
E. Table of Regulars and Militia furnished during the Revolution 391
F. List of Members of the Cincinnati Society of Maryland 392
G. Lords Proprietary of Maryland 366
H. Governors of Maryland 398
I. Members of the Maryland Convention of 1776, which framed the Constitution of the State 399
J. Ratification of the Constitution of the United States by the Maryland Convention, 1788 400
K. Maryland Senators in the United States' Senates 401
L. Votes of the Maryland Electors for President and Vice President of the United States. 402
M. Population of Maryland, from its first settlement 403
N. Note to page 22 405

 

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