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Welcome to
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History & Genealogy

The
BLACK PHALANX;

A History of the

NEGRO SOLDIERS OF THE UNITED STATES
in the Wars of
1775-1812, 1861-'65,
By
Joseph T. Wilson
Late of the 2nd Reg't. La. Native Guard Vols. 54th Mass. Vols.
Aide-De-camp to the Commander-In-Chief G. A. R.
Author of
"Emancipation," "Voice of a New Race,"  "Twenty-Two Years of Freedom," etc., etc.
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56 Illustrations
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Hartford, Conn.:
American Publishing Company
1890

PT II.

CHAPTER V. -
DEPARTMENT of the GULF
pg. 183
 

     When Admiral Farragut's fleet anchored at New Orleans, and Butler occupied the city, three regiments of confederate negro troops were under arms guarding the United States Mint building, with orders to destroy it before surrendering it to the Yankees.  The brigade, however, was in command of a Creole mulatto, who, instead of carrying out the orders given him, and following the troops out of the city on their retreat, counter-marched his command and was cut off from the main body of the army by the Federal forces, to whom they quietly surrendered a few days after.
     General Phelps commanded the Federal forces at Carrolton, about seven miles from New Orleans, the principal point in the cordon around the city.  Here the slaves congregated in large numbers, seeking freedom and protection from their barbarous overseers and masters.  Some of these poor creatures wore irons and chains; some came bleeding from gun-shot wounds.  General Phelps was an old abolitionist, and had early conceived the idea that the proper thing to do was for the government to arm the negroes.  Now came his opportunity to act. Hundreds of able-bodied men were in his camps, ready and willing to fight for their freedom and the preservation of the Union.  The secessionists in that neighborhood complained to General Butler about their negroes leaving them and going into camp with the Yankees.  So numerous were the complaints, that the General, acting under orders from Washington, and also foreseeing that

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Washing in Camp
Washing in Camp
 

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Cooking in Camp
Cooking in Camp

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Point Isabel, Texas
POINT ISABEL, TEXAS
Phalanx soldiers on duty, throwing up earthworks.

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The Recruiting Office
THE RECRUITING OFFICE
Negroes enlisting in the army, and being examined by surgeons.

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BATTLE of MILLIKEN'S BEND

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UNLOADING GOVT. STORES

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PORT HUDSON.
Brilliant charge of the Phalanx upon the Confederate works.
 

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[Pg. 220] - CHAPTER VI. - THE ARMY OF THE FRONTIER
 

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