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The
BLACK PHALANX;

A History of the

NEGRO SOLDIERS OF THE UNITED STATES
in the Wars of
1775-1812, 1861-'65,
By
Joseph T. Wilson
Late of the 2nd Reg't. La. Native Guard Vols. 54th Mass. Vols.
Aide-De-camp to the Commander-In-Chief G. A. R.
Author of
"Emancipation," "Voice of a New Race,"  "Twenty-Two Years of Freedom," etc., etc.
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56 Illustrations
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Hartford, Conn.:
American Publishing Company
1890

CHAPTER XI. -
THE PHALANX IN VIRGINIA.
pg. 377 - 462

     The laurels won by the Phalanx in the Southern States, notwithstanding the "no quarter" policy, was proof of its devoiton to the cause of liberty and the old flag, which latter, until within a short period had been but a symbol of oppression to the black man; Cailloux has reddened it with his life's blood, and Carney in a seething fire had planted it on the ramparts of Wagner.  The audacious bravery of the Phalanx had wrung form Generals Banks and Gillmore congratulatory orders, while the looyal people of the nation poured out unstinted praises.  Not a breach of discipline marred the negro soldier's record; not one cowardly act tarnished their fame.  Grant pronounced them gallant and reliable, and Weitzel was willing to command them.
     In New York City, where negroes had been hung to lamp posts, and where a colored orphan asylum had been sacked adn burned, crowds gathered in Broadway and cheered Phalanx regiments on their way to the front.  General Logan, author of the Illinois Black Code, greeted them as comrades, and Jefferson Davis finally accorded to them the rights due captured soldiers as prisoners of war.  Congress at last took up the question of pay, and placed the black on an equal footing with the white soldiers.  Their valor, excelled by no troops in the field, had finally won full recognition from every quarter, and henceforth they were to share the full glory as well as the toils of their white comrades-in-arms.  Not until those just

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In the Trenches

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Before Petersburg, Burying Dead Under Flag of Truce

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Govrnt. Blacksmiths Shop

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"YOU MUST THROW AWAY THAT CIGAR, SIR!"
A Phalanx guard refusing to allow General U. S. Grant to pass by the commissary store-house till he had thrown away his cigar.

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RECEIVING THE PRESIDENT
Abraham Lincoln riding through Richmond, April 4th, 1865, after the evacuation of the city by the Confederates

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     On the 24th of May the 25th Corps began embarking for Texas by way of Mobile Bay.  The troops, however, occupied Texas but a short time, the confederate forces there surrendering upon the same terms as those of General Lee.  All fears having been dissipated, the troops were slowly mustered out of the United States service.  The men returned to their wonted fields of labor to provide for their long-neglected families, upon a new career of peace and happiness, rising, Phoenix like, from the ashes of slavery to join the Phalanx of industry in upbuilding the greatness of their country, which they had aided in saving from desolation and ruin.
     Such is the history of the negro in the wars of the United States.  Coming to its shores in the condition of slavery, it required more than two centuries for the entire race to reach the estate of freedom.  But the imperishable records of their deeds show that however humble and despised they have been in all political and social relations they have never been wanting in patriotism at periods of public peril.  Their devotion has been not only unappreciated, but it has failed to receive a fitting commemoration in pages of national history.  It has been the purpose of the writer of this volume to relate herein the patriotic career of the negro race in this country in an authentic and connected form.  In the time to come the race will take care of itself.  Slavery is ended, and now they are striking off link by link the chains of ignorance which the servitude of some and the humility of all imposed upon them.  If the past is the story of an oppressed race, the future will reveal that of one uprisen to great opportunities, which they will improve from generation to generation, and guard with the same vigilance that they will the liberties and boundaries of the land.
 

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